flamgirlant

flamboyant. but with boobs.
My Etsy Shop
Recent Tweets @flamgirlant
Posts tagged "wilco"
617 plays 617 plays
Billy Bragg & Wilco,
Mermaid Avenue

Billy Bragg & Wilco - “California Stars”

One of the greatest Woodie Guthrie songs that almost wasn’t.

(via: gbabuts: gm)

1,087 plays 1,087 plays
Wilco,
The Whole Love

Wilco - “Capitol City”

I’m sick.  Went to bed with a sore throat and woke up this morning unable to swallow and with white spots on my tonsils.  I have strep throat. 

Know what else I have?  Tickets to see Wilco tonight.  Dammit.  I’ve had them for months.  Doc said as long as I don’t kiss anyone, spit on anyone or share my drinks with anyone I can go to the show.

I have a few friends coming up to Milwaukee to party with me at the show.  I think it’s best I just meet them for the concert and then head home after.  I don’t want to get them sick.  And I can’t really go out drinking, it hurts to damn much.  This night is so not going like I wanted it to.

just found out that The Whole Love is #4 on the album charts in Croatia.

Wilco’s Facebook

Just found that quite amusing, for some reason.

Not a bad way to start off a rainy Saturday morning.

Later I’ll be cutting a rug at my cousin’s wedding.  I’ll even be wearing a skirt.  Pencil skirt.  And heels.  I would bring my lovely little black vintage clutch, but flasks don’t fit all that well in there.  I’m not a tap Miller Lite drinker.  A broad goes places prepared.

Theologians. They don’t know nothing about my soul.
Wilco - “Theologians”

Wilco coffee. I’ll take mine "Bull Black Nova" with a dash of "Candy Floss" and wonder where’s the "A Shot In The Arm" espresso?

Check it! My blog bro Jimmy asked if I would do a guest post for his blog Head Underwater - how could I say no?  This cat has turned me on to some fantastic bands and I felt I needed to do him a solid and write something with more substance than my normal "this sounds like >insert dirty/naughty/trippy reference here<".  So I decided to spill a shameful secret and learn a little something from musical history in the process.
Thanks Jimmy for letting me pull that skeleton out of the closet!!
headunderwater:

GUEST POST: Krautrock? WTF is Krautrock?
Today’s guest post is from Amy aka Flamgirlant, “you know flamboyant, but with boobs”. Amy comes to us via the frozen tundrea of the north, from the Good Lands of Milwaukee, WI [which is host one of my favorite movie scenes]. Amy is a good go to for nuggets in the fuzzed out world of garage rock and if you need anyone to tell you beards and mustaches are awesome and not creep. Matter back she loves so much she puts them into cross-stitch. Be sure to give her a good old fashion tumblr follow and download her radtastic mixtapes at her Mixtape Hub.
I have a secret. It’s a shameful secret and one that I feel threatens my cred as a music snob. It’s embarrassing to admit, but here goes: I don’t know what krautrock is. I know it’s German and likely involves some sort of electronic music, but so does Sprockets. I’m pretty sure a vision of Dieter saying “Now’s the time on Sprockets when we dance” is not what should come to mind when I hear “krautrock”. After all, bands such as Wilco, Deerhunter and Fujiya & Miyagi have been accused of krautrock influences and they just don’t jive with vogueing in black body suits.
It was high time Iremedy this situation and learn about krautrock; fill in the gaps of my mental musical reference library, if you will. I want to be able to know exactly what someone means when they use krautrock as a way to describe a band. Somehow, I stumbled across a BBC Four documentary on YouTube called Krautrock: The Rebirth of Germany* which quite literally rocked my world.
Krautrock was a term coined by the UK music press as a way to categorize the experimental music coming from Germany in the 70’s and was more a slur on the origins of the music rather than the scene that it came from. Remember this is after WWII and the Germans (“Krauts”) were the butt of many jokes of the day (think Monty Python).
In actuality, the seeds of krautrock were planted in the 60’s and grew with social revolution happening at the time. Imagine it - a generation born into post-war rubble with a country split into two and those in power were the same folk that were in power during the war. They needed to damn The Man. They needed their own identity. Music was their weapon of choice. So they take what they know from their history (classical, folk) and mix in what they’ve gleaned from others (rock, jazz, blues) and a dash of the unknown (space) and in a fit of experimentation and radical politics make something that is their own. Enter krautrock.
The beauty of krautrock is that it isn’t one specific sound. Experimental, avant-garde and progressive, yes, but full of so many flavors. Can, one of the first krautrock bands, wove jazz improvisation and a touch of psychedelia into their jams. Tangerine Dream was one of the first bands to use the newly invented synthesizer in their music adding a spacey, ambient feel to their experimental rock. Neu! stripped down the traditional rock song into a continual, minimalist beat layered with harmonic drones best described by Iggy Pop as “pastoral pscychedelicism”. Faust was incredibly avant-garde crafting a cacophonous sound that was like cut-and-paste of musical fragments. Kraftwerk was the breakout krautrock band and one that ditched the guitar and drums to go completely electronic in 1974. Strong rhythmic structures and minimal lyrics were used to convey modern urban life - celebrating the joys of modern technology while also experiencing a sense of alienation.
So yeah, now I get it. Later Wilco material pulls heavily from krautrock. Take “Spiders (Kidsmoke)” for instance. Constant, repetitive beats, the “noise” bits peppered throughout. It falls a bit under that Can and Neu! umbrella. Deerhunter’s “Slow Swords” channels a bit of Faust, don’t you think? More avant-garde and experimental with lots of looping and layering of sounds. Just listen to “Hundreds & Thousands” by Fujiya & Miyagi – totally catch the Neu! and a bit of Kraftwerk in there.
I never knew that the ambient drone and repetitive rhythms that I love so much in the music I listen to now has krautrock to thank. Do yourself a favor and watch this BBC krautrock documentary* – you’ll learn something. Maybe even find a new favorite band to explore. As for me, I’m gonna dig into the Can and Neu! catalogs before dipping my toes into Prog Rock Brittania.
*Krautrock: The Rebirth of Germany – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

Check it! My blog bro Jimmy asked if I would do a guest post for his blog Head Underwater - how could I say no?  This cat has turned me on to some fantastic bands and I felt I needed to do him a solid and write something with more substance than my normal "this sounds like >insert dirty/naughty/trippy reference here<".  So I decided to spill a shameful secret and learn a little something from musical history in the process.

Thanks Jimmy for letting me pull that skeleton out of the closet!!

headunderwater:

GUEST POST: Krautrock? WTF is Krautrock?

Today’s guest post is from Amy aka Flamgirlant, “you know flamboyant, but with boobs”. Amy comes to us via the frozen tundrea of the north, from the Good Lands of Milwaukee, WI [which is host one of my favorite movie scenes]. Amy is a good go to for nuggets in the fuzzed out world of garage rock and if you need anyone to tell you beards and mustaches are awesome and not creep. Matter back she loves so much she puts them into cross-stitch. Be sure to give her a good old fashion tumblr follow and download her radtastic mixtapes at her Mixtape Hub.

I have a secret. It’s a shameful secret and one that I feel threatens my cred as a music snob. It’s embarrassing to admit, but here goes: I don’t know what krautrock is. I know it’s German and likely involves some sort of electronic music, but so does Sprockets. I’m pretty sure a vision of Dieter saying “Now’s the time on Sprockets when we dance” is not what should come to mind when I hear “krautrock”. After all, bands such as Wilco, Deerhunter and Fujiya & Miyagi have been accused of krautrock influences and they just don’t jive with vogueing in black body suits.

It was high time Iremedy this situation and learn about krautrock; fill in the gaps of my mental musical reference library, if you will. I want to be able to know exactly what someone means when they use krautrock as a way to describe a band. Somehow, I stumbled across a BBC Four documentary on YouTube called Krautrock: The Rebirth of Germany* which quite literally rocked my world.

Krautrock was a term coined by the UK music press as a way to categorize the experimental music coming from Germany in the 70’s and was more a slur on the origins of the music rather than the scene that it came from. Remember this is after WWII and the Germans (“Krauts”) were the butt of many jokes of the day (think Monty Python).

In actuality, the seeds of krautrock were planted in the 60’s and grew with social revolution happening at the time. Imagine it - a generation born into post-war rubble with a country split into two and those in power were the same folk that were in power during the war. They needed to damn The Man. They needed their own identity. Music was their weapon of choice. So they take what they know from their history (classical, folk) and mix in what they’ve gleaned from others (rock, jazz, blues) and a dash of the unknown (space) and in a fit of experimentation and radical politics make something that is their own. Enter krautrock.

The beauty of krautrock is that it isn’t one specific sound. Experimental, avant-garde and progressive, yes, but full of so many flavors. Can, one of the first krautrock bands, wove jazz improvisation and a touch of psychedelia into their jams. Tangerine Dream was one of the first bands to use the newly invented synthesizer in their music adding a spacey, ambient feel to their experimental rock. Neu! stripped down the traditional rock song into a continual, minimalist beat layered with harmonic drones best described by Iggy Pop as “pastoral pscychedelicism”. Faust was incredibly avant-garde crafting a cacophonous sound that was like cut-and-paste of musical fragments. Kraftwerk was the breakout krautrock band and one that ditched the guitar and drums to go completely electronic in 1974. Strong rhythmic structures and minimal lyrics were used to convey modern urban life - celebrating the joys of modern technology while also experiencing a sense of alienation.

So yeah, now I get it. Later Wilco material pulls heavily from krautrock. Take Spiders (Kidsmoke)” for instance. Constant, repetitive beats, the “noise” bits peppered throughout. It falls a bit under that Can and Neu! umbrella. Deerhunter’s “Slow Swords” channels a bit of Faust, don’t you think? More avant-garde and experimental with lots of looping and layering of sounds. Just listen to “Hundreds & Thousands” by Fujiya & Miyagi – totally catch the Neu! and a bit of Kraftwerk in there.

I never knew that the ambient drone and repetitive rhythms that I love so much in the music I listen to now has krautrock to thank. Do yourself a favor and watch this BBC krautrock documentary* – you’ll learn something. Maybe even find a new favorite band to explore. As for me, I’m gonna dig into the Can and Neu! catalogs before dipping my toes into Prog Rock Brittania.

*Krautrock: The Rebirth of Germany – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

Wisco: A Tribute To Wilco’s Summerteetha music compilation featuring our favorite Wisconsin artists each covering a track off of Wilco’s 1999 LP, Summerteeth

What an amazing project.  Please visit Muzzle of Bees and download this great compilation and discover great Wisconsin artists such as Decibully, Conrad Plymouth, Juniper Tar, Flight and many, many others.  We rock more than just beer around here, folks.

Kick Ass Solid Sound Festival Poster by Nicole Blauw Design

(via Wilco’s Facebook)